PHOTOS: The Taliban flew a Black Hawk helicopter over a parade of military equipment captured when it overran Afghanistan

Rep. McCarthy threatens tech and telecom firms that comply with Jan.6 committee’s request

Slide 1 of 12: Perennials, as the term implies, are plants that can live for years, even decades, adding beauty to your garden with very little care. Flowering perennials typically produce blooms by the second year, though some will burst with color the very first year. And spring perennials? Well, can you think of a better way to chase away the winter blues than with pretty pink, yellow, purple, and more hues?  Fall, with its combination of still-warm soil and cooler, wetter weather, presents the ideal opportunity to encourage root growth in new spring perennials. So admire the varieties here, pick your favorites, and set the stage for spectacular spring flowers. Related: Solved! What are Biennial Plants?

Slide 2 of 12: If you get impatient for posies as the winter drags on, put in hellebores (Helleborus) now. Also known as Lenten rose, this is one of the first flowers to appear each year, often poking through the snow with big, bowl-shaped, pink, yellow, or maroon blooms. Hardy hellebores do best in slightly shaded spots and neutral soils with good drainage in Zones 5 to 9.

Slide 3 of 12: Certainly no shrinking violet, pasque flower (Pulsatilla vulgaris) is a showstopper with bold, purple, bell-shaped blossoms demanding attention in Zones 4 to 8. Pasque is an old French word for Easter, and this perennial is bound to bloom in time for the holiday—and fortunately, it is also rabbit resistant. The gorgeous garden star (also known as wind flower and meadow anemone) flourishes in fertile soil with good drainage and full to partial sun for easy purple spring flowers.

Slide 4 of 12: For colorful ground cover, consider creeping phlox (Phlox subulata). Phlox is the Greek word for fire, and this mat-forming plant will set your landscape ablaze with small, fragrant, flat blooms in purple, pink, red, and white beginning in March. It’s a favorite for filling in rock gardens and can be especially pretty draping over a wall. Plant phlox in Zones 3 to 9, choosing a spot that receives dappled sun and has sandy soil that gets good drainage. 

Get Paid $200 by Signing Up for This New Card (Yeah, Seriously)

Ad Microsoft

Slide 5 of 12: For whom do these bells toll? Any gardener in hardiness Zones 3 through 8 who doesn’t like a lot of toil. Virginia bluebell (Mertensia virginica) pops out in early spring flowers that start pale and turn a rich, true blue. They thrive in moist soil and half sun/half shade conditions, eventually establishing a colony of pollinator-friendly ground cover with virtually zero care.

Slide 6 of 12: Prized for its graceful, nodding blooms, columbine (Aquilegia) is a woodland perennial, meaning it likes a shady or partly shaded location and consistently moist soil. Its white, yellow, red, or blue flowers appear in early spring and keep it up through mid-summer. The only caveat is that columbine is one of the shorter-lived perennials; if you love them, add a few more plants every year or so in Zones 3 to 8.  Related:  Hardiness Zones 101: What All Home Gardeners Need to Know

Slide 7 of 12: Tall, resilient false indigo (Baptisia) flowers in late spring through fall with thick stalks and spires of small, dark blue blooms. If blue isn’t your bag, check out hybrids in other colors, including yellow and pink. False indigo likes full sun but can deal with some shade in hardiness Zones 3 to 9. False indigo is drought tolerant, beckons bees and butterflies, and is unlikely to get nibbled by rabbits and deer.

Slide 8 of 12: Must be those long, fuzzy, pale-colored flowers that give Astilbe its common nickname of false goat’s beard. This practically trouble-free plant that blooms in spring through summer is especially popular as a border in partly shady areas. Its flowers contrast well against broad, leafy foliage. Astilbe thrives in loamy, slightly acidic soil in hardiness Zones 3 to 8.

Slide 9 of 12: Attention gardeners in the Southwest who can’t abide on cactus alone: Sundrops (Calylophus hartwegii) are a perfect perennial pick, flowering in March through October. A member of the night-blooming primrose family, the flower opens with bright yellow petals around sunset and stays that way through the next day. Plant in partly shaded areas with dry soil in Zones 5 to 9.

Simple Trick To Clean Driveway 10x Faster (In Under 5 Minutes)

Ad Microsoft

Slide 10 of 12: Shade happens—and that’s not a problem for lamium (Lamium maculatum). This lovely yet tough ground cover can take on bare spots, such as beneath trees, like nobody’s business. Lamium boasts variegated foliage in silver, gold, and green plus dainty pink and purple flowers that appear in late spring and summer. This rugged plant can thrive in clay and alkaline soils, and it actually prefers drier conditions in Zones 3 to 8. Tip: Deadhead flowers once they fade to encourage a new crop of blooms.

Slide 11 of 12: For a flowering perennial that smells as nice as it looks, let Dianthus adorn your landscape. This flower family offers clusters of spunky spring-through-summer blooms in a range of hues, including pink, white, yellow, and red against blue-green leaves. Dianthus, a sun worshipper that thrives in well-draining soil in Zones 4 to 8, and is ideal in rock gardens, containers, and as borders. Its rich nectar will attract pollinators yet deer and bunnies won’t bother with it.  Related:  11 Shrubs That Can Handle the Heat of Full Sun

Slide 12 of 12: Tap into your spidey sense with this perennial superhero, which grows in clumps and flowers in May through July in Zones 4 to 8. Spiderwort (Tradescantia) boasts three-petal purple posies that contrast strikingly with its gold-tinged, grass-like leaves. A low-maintenance lovely, it thrives in full sun to partial shade and various types of soil, including sand and clay, but it’s fairly thirsty so keep it moist, not wet.

Full screen

1/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

The Gift That Keeps on Giving

Perennials, as the term implies, are plants that can live for years, even decades, adding beauty to your garden with very little care. Flowering perennials typically produce blooms by the second year, though some will burst with color the very first year. And spring perennials? Well, can you think of a better way to chase away the winter blues than with pretty pink, yellow, purple, and more hues?

Fall, with its combination of still-warm soil and cooler, wetter weather, presents the ideal opportunity to encourage root growth in new spring perennials. So admire the varieties here, pick your favorites, and set the stage for spectacular spring flowers.

Related: Solved! What are Biennial Plants?

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

2/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Say Hello to Hellebores

If you get impatient for posies as the winter drags on, put in hellebores (Helleborus) now. Also known as Lenten rose, this is one of the first flowers to appear each year, often poking through the snow with big, bowl-shaped, pink, yellow, or maroon blooms. Hardy hellebores do best in slightly shaded spots and neutral soils with good drainage in Zones 5 to 9.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

3/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Power Up with Pasque Flower

Certainly no shrinking violet, pasque flower (Pulsatilla vulgaris) is a showstopper with bold, purple, bell-shaped blossoms demanding attention in Zones 4 to 8. Pasque is an old French word for Easter, and this perennial is bound to bloom in time for the holiday—and fortunately, it is also rabbit resistant. The gorgeous garden star (also known as wind flower and meadow anemone) flourishes in fertile soil with good drainage and full to partial sun for easy purple spring flowers.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

4/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Take Cover With Creeping Phlox

For colorful ground cover, consider creeping phlox (Phlox subulata). Phlox is the Greek word for fire, and this mat-forming plant will set your landscape ablaze with small, fragrant, flat blooms in purple, pink, red, and white beginning in March. It’s a favorite for filling in rock gardens and can be especially pretty draping over a wall. Plant phlox in Zones 3 to 9, choosing a spot that receives dappled sun and has sandy soil that gets good drainage. 

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Slideshow continues on the next slide

5/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Ring in Bluebells

For whom do these bells toll? Any gardener in hardiness Zones 3 through 8 who doesn’t like a lot of toil. Virginia bluebell (Mertensia virginica) pops out in early spring flowers that start pale and turn a rich, true blue. They thrive in moist soil and half sun/half shade conditions, eventually establishing a colony of pollinator-friendly ground cover with virtually zero care.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

6/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Welcome Columbine

Prized for its graceful, nodding blooms, columbine (Aquilegia) is a woodland perennial, meaning it likes a shady or partly shaded location and consistently moist soil. Its white, yellow, red, or blue flowers appear in early spring and keep it up through mid-summer. The only caveat is that columbine is one of the shorter-lived perennials; if you love them, add a few more plants every year or so in Zones 3 to 8. 

Related: Hardiness Zones 101: What All Home Gardeners Need to Know

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

7/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Be True to False Indigo

Tall, resilient false indigo (Baptisia) flowers in late spring through fall with thick stalks and spires of small, dark blue blooms. If blue isn’t your bag, check out hybrids in other colors, including yellow and pink. False indigo likes full sun but can deal with some shade in hardiness Zones 3 to 9. False indigo is drought tolerant, beckons bees and butterflies, and is unlikely to get nibbled by rabbits and deer.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

8/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Add in Astilbe

Must be those long, fuzzy, pale-colored flowers that give Astilbe its common nickname of false goat’s beard. This practically trouble-free plant that blooms in spring through summer is especially popular as a border in partly shady areas. Its flowers contrast well against broad, leafy foliage. Astilbe thrives in loamy, slightly acidic soil in hardiness Zones 3 to 8.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

9/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Let the Sundrops In

Attention gardeners in the Southwest who can’t abide on cactus alone: Sundrops (Calylophus hartwegii) are a perfect perennial pick, flowering in March through October. A member of the night-blooming primrose family, the flower opens with bright yellow petals around sunset and stays that way through the next day. Plant in partly shaded areas with dry soil in Zones 5 to 9.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Slideshow continues on the next slide

10/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Gotta Love Lamium

Shade happens—and that’s not a problem for lamium (Lamium maculatum). This lovely yet tough ground cover can take on bare spots, such as beneath trees, like nobody’s business. Lamium boasts variegated foliage in silver, gold, and green plus dainty pink and purple flowers that appear in late spring and summer. This rugged plant can thrive in clay and alkaline soils, and it actually prefers drier conditions in Zones 3 to 8. Tip: Deadhead flowers once they fade to encourage a new crop of blooms.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

11/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Indulge in Dianthus

For a flowering perennial that smells as nice as it looks, let Dianthus adorn your landscape. This flower family offers clusters of spunky spring-through-summer blooms in a range of hues, including pink, white, yellow, and red against blue-green leaves. Dianthus, a sun worshipper that thrives in well-draining soil in Zones 4 to 8, and is ideal in rock gardens, containers, and as borders. Its rich nectar will attract pollinators yet deer and bunnies won’t bother with it. 

Related: 11 Shrubs That Can Handle the Heat of Full Sun

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

12/12 SLIDES © istockphoto.com

Weave in Spiderwort

Tap into your spidey sense with this perennial superhero, which grows in clumps and flowers in May through July in Zones 4 to 8. Spiderwort (Tradescantia) boasts three-petal purple posies that contrast strikingly with its gold-tinged, grass-like leaves. A low-maintenance lovely, it thrives in full sun to partial shade and various types of soil, including sand and clay, but it’s fairly thirsty so keep it moist, not wet.

Microsoft and partners may be compensated if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

12/12 SLIDES

SHARE

SHARE

TWEET

SHARE

EMAIL

1/12 SLIDES